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Preliminary Draft Program Grid for David G. Hartwell

This is the Preliminary Draft program schedule. David G. Hartwell may or may not actually be on these items, but probably will. However, due to circumstances beyond our control, modifications to the program can occur throughout the convention.

Friday 9:00 pm: Don't Go There. Unless You Really Want To. (Ends at: 9:55 pm) Bethesda
Panelists: Brenda W. Clough, David G. Hartwell, Shahid Mahmud, Jean Marie Ward (M)
Taboo subjects in fantasy and science fiction. Are there any? What lines won't you cross? What lines should you cross?
Friday 11:00 pm: The Appeal of King Arthur (Ends at: 11:55 pm) Salon A
Panelists: Tom Doyle, Max Gladstone, David G. Hartwell, Darrell Schweitzer, Jean Marie Ward (M)
What makes so many writers from Twain to Mary Stewart to Lerner and Lowe produce their own takes on 'the matter of Britain'? Why do King Arthur books thrive while other legends like Robin Hood get far less attention? What are the best takes on the Arthurian legend?
Saturday 11:00 am: Anthology Builder (Ends at: 11:55 am) Rockville/ Potomac
Panelists: Neil Clarke, Ron Garner (M), Robert Greenberger, David G. Hartwell, Mike McPhail, Alex Shvartsman
So you want to edit and publish an anthology. How do the stories get picked? How do you come up with a theme? What sells and what doesn't? How do authors produce readable fiction in the straitjacket of an original themed anthology? How do you properly curate your anthology?
Saturday 5:00 pm: I Hate His/Her Politics But I Love His/Her Books (Ends at: 5:55 pm) Salon A
Panelists: Day Al-Mohamed, Paolo Bacigalupi, David G. Hartwell, Larry Hodges, Natalie Luhrs, Sunny Moraine (M)
Should a personal evaluation of an author be separated from how you view his/her politics? Many people refused to see the movie Ender's Game because of Orson Scott Card's statements on homosexuality and other writers charge that political views influence award nominations and who is picked for con programming. Is this true and if so, is it a good thing or a bad thing?
Saturday 7:30 pm: Mass Signing (Ends at: 8:25 pm) Salon A
Panelists: Danielle Ackley-McPhail, Sarah Avery, Paolo Bacigalupi, Holly Black, Marilyn "Mattie" Brahen, Neil Clarke, Tom Doyle, Andy Duncan, Scott Edelman, Jim Freund, Charles E. Gannon, Max Gladstone, David G. Hartwell, Alma Katsu, Pamela K. Kinney, Barbara Krasnoff, Dina Leacock, James Maxey, Will McIntosh, Mike McPhail, Sunny Moraine, James Morrow, Sarah Pinsker, Benjamin Rosenbaum, Lawrence M. Schoen, Darrell Schweitzer, Alex Shvartsman, Jon Skovron, Alan Smale, Bud Sparhawk, Janine Spendlove, Genevieve Valentine, Michael A. Ventrella, Lawrence Watt-Evans
The Saturday evening mass autographing session.
Sunday 12:00 pm: Bookstores: RIP or Not Dead Yet? (Ends at: 12:55 pm) Bethesda
Panelists: Paolo Bacigalupi, David G. Hartwell, Shahid Mahmud
With the growth of Amazon online, the demise of Borders, the shrinking of Barnes & Noble, the greatly diminished number of brick and mortar independent bookstores, and the rapid adoption of ebooks, does the traditional bookstore have a future? What is the role of bookstores in the age of instantly downloadable ebooks and Amazon Prime? Can we do anything to save the bookstore? Should we?
Sunday 3:00 pm: Reviews vs Literary Criticism (Ends at: 3:55 pm) Frederick
Panelists: D. Douglas Fratz, David G. Hartwell, Natalie Luhrs, Darrell Schweitzer, Gayle Surrette (M)
There are many different levels of reviewing. Publications such as Publishers Weekly and Romantic Times typically want only a couple hundred words, in SFRevu 500-1000 words is pretty standard, and the New York Review of Science Fiction publishes 3000+ word reviews. There are reviews that exist primarily to give readers a general idea as to whether they want to buy the newly published book without spoiling the book, and there are longer more academically oriented reviews which attempt to engage with the novel in a broader context to put the book in its place within the genre and which generally assume the reader of the review has already read the book. Do you write the review from the head or from the heart? How much of the plot should you discuss?

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